Daily Archives: December 21, 2011 10:22 am

Trolololo sheet music for piano

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Before you get excited, I haven’t got it, but I have found the first page of it here.  I tried searching for the original title “я очень рад ведь я наконец возвращаюсь домой” and ноты (sheet music). The page I found came from a Russian sheet music site called true-notki.ru which has now closed.

Surely someone has published this? To any Russian music publishers out there, you must be crazy not to just get off your butts and publish this. Someone gets to my site by searching for  ‘trolololo sheet music’ nearly every day.

Update on Christmas day (25/12/11): 

Just in time for Christmas, someone has put a link to the file in the comments below. There’s also, I’ve discovered, another link to the sheet music for the Trolololo song here. All not really above board, so my question remains: why doesn’t a mainstream publisher publish it on the mainstream as a digital download?  I reckon it could have made them millionaires by now.

IT tips #21: Drag your most-used sites on to your links bar in a browser

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I’m sure nearly everybody knows about this, but today’s tip is just a nudge to actually do it: if you have sites that you regularly visit – Facebook, email, the news, an online calendar, Amazon, favourite shops, etc. don’t waste time looking them up in your ‘favourites’. Next time you’re at one of those sites,  just drag the address into the links bar of your browser. Get rid of all the crap ones that were pre-loaded there first, so you’ve got room.

There’s a quick video below of how to do this in Chrome, but the procedure’s the same in every browser I’ve come across:

  1. Delete unwanted links from the links bar (or bookmarks bar as it’s called in Chrome) by CTRL-click  (Mac) or right click (PC) and selecting ‘delete’ for each unwanted link. This makes space for your own links.
  2. Go to  one of your favourite/most used  pages such as your web email account or Facebook, for example
  3. With the mouse, grab hold of the ‘favicon’ (the small image immediately left of the address) and drag it down to an empty space on the links bar. The cursor will turn to a + sign when you’re correctly positioned. Note: if you can’t see the links bar, it’s probably because you’ve opted to remove it from view – so go to the ‘View’ menu and make sure that the links/bookmarks bar is ticked.
  4. Let go of the mouse button (i.e. drop)
  5. Right-click/CTRL-click and edit the name of the link you just dropped  to something short and memorable (so you can get more links in the bar). I use initials – i.e. Metafilter becomes MF
  6. Next time you want to go to one of your favourite sites, just click on the icon in the links bar

NOTES

  • You can re-order the links on the bar by dragging them from left to right
  • If you have links to several pages on the same site, you can create a folder on the toolbar and drop all the links to those  pages into that folder.
  • If your links bar starts running off the right hand side of the screen, delete some links. There’s no point in a links bar where you can’t see the links.

At last: a picture of a mirliton

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I can’t tell you how pleased I am about this: Here, on a site dedicated to the iconography of the bagpipe, are two pictures of mirlitons (scroll down to see them), placed as I have always suspected within the general category of kazoo-like instruments, in French termed “flûte eunuque, kazoo, mirliton ou bigophone”. ‘Danse des Bigophones’ has a certain ring, n’est-ce pas?  The pictures clearly show the the swirling stripes as they are seen in the mirliton costumes of some productions.

A history of my search for the meaning of mirliton

in case you didn’t know, I’ve been perplexed and annoyed by the term ‘Mirliton’ in The Nutcracker for years – how does this thing turn from marzipan, to reed pipes, to shepherdesses. What is a mirliton? Why do people talk about them as if we’ve all seen one (I never have). I’ve posted on mirlitons as cakes before, but I still have never seen evidence of the supposed mirliton-as-reed-pipe. My mind is finally at peace on this issue and I shall have a happier Christmas.

Update on 27th May, 2012: Here’s another  picture of a mirliton from a site about traditional instruments of the Iberian peninsula. There’s also a sound clip if you want to know what Tchaikovsky may have had in mind. Though I’m still rather convinced that the piece is a pun on Mirlitons de Pont-Audemer, as I wrote in a previous post, with a double pun lurking in the background, since pastushka (Russian for shepherdess) and pastiche (French for pastry) are so close in sound.